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My Daddy

Dad. Father. Papa. The one who holds the family together. Patriarch. Leader. Bear hugger. Most memorable laugher. Teacher of life lessons. The one who taught me to drive. Passion instiller. Farmer. Daddy. 

Dads are one of the most important people in our lives. My Dad meant so much to me. He was the reason I am who I am today. I remember from a young age farming with my dad. Driving around with him checking fields. I even had a small table in his office at the farm that I pretended to work just like him. He taught me so much about agriculture. He is the reason I love agriculture and farming. He gave me my passion for agriculture. He was so proud that my sister and I wanted to be involved in agriculture too. But he hated that I went to school so far away. And even though I didn’t come home to farm with him as planned, I married an almond farmer who he loved as his own son. 


It pains me to write about my Dad in past tense. There will be no more memories and future planning with my Dad. My…

Thankful for my health

It's the last week of November and I hope this month of thankfulness doesn't stop. Hopefully you have followed along on my thankful journey and you have enjoyed it.
I am thankful for all of you readers who have played along with me and hope you also have spread your own thankful love and appreciation in your own ways.




Remember to like this post and let me know what you are thankful for. I will pick one thankful person to share some nutty goodness with!


I am thankful for my health.




It's now officially winter and with the colder weather comes the snotty noses and the dry coughs. There is nothing I hate more about the change of weather, then the increase of the cold and flu season. It is nothing a little cough syrup can't cure though.  But besides the head colds that bless our house a few times a year, we are a pretty healthy household. I am very thankful for this.


For some reason it seems harder for me to eat healthier in the winter. The abundance of fresh fruit and vegetables grown in my backyard diminishes and the rich soups or carbs seem more tempting. I am thankful for the healthier options of food available and need to work on adding them in my winter diet more.


Exercise is always easier do to in the summer when you want to be outside enjoying the sun. It is hard to get active outside when the weather is cooler and you have to layer up to stay warm. I am thankful for the mild California winters that still allow me to walk to pick up my son from school or take a stroll at the farm between chores. And of course we can all make new years resolutions to get fit and join a gym, but I think we all know how that will turn out. Just making an attempt to stay fit and healthy is good in my book, but it is staying honest and accountable that will keep you healthy.


We live in a day in age where severe illness affect most of us. If not directly, then indirectly. Most of us have a family member or close friend that has been diagnosed with cancer or a life threatening illness. Currently, I have two family members battling cancer and man does cancer suck. Cancer is an evil illness that can totally transform a persons body and way of life.


However, I am thankful for the advancements in medicine today that make having cancer not as terrible as it once was. Cancer can be treated and defeated. I pray that the loved ones I hold dear to me heart will beat their cancer and thrive through it. I am thankful for their doctors and medicine that are making them better. Slowly, but surely they will beat this.


I am thankful for modern day medicine and research that goes into making people healthy and preventing illness. My family has made it a priority to be more thankful and support organizations that do research and studies to prevent and treat cancer and life threatening illnesses.
For my son's third birthday this year, we are asking our friends and family to donate to St Jude's instead of buying a birthday gift for our son. It is my hope that we can help a child in need. We are blessed with our own health and we are thankful for what we have. We want to pass that on to someone who needs help more than we do.


This holiday season I challenge you to give thankfulness and love to those in need. Don't let it stop.


What are you thankful for?


Until Next Time,
Almond Girl Jenny

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