Skip to main content

What to do with all the fresh fruit from your fruit tree

It's summer and nothing says summer more to me than fresh fruit right off the tree. I am lucky to have grown up with a whole row of fruit trees in my Dad's orchard. He has a few of everything; plums, peaches, nectarines, cherries, apples, pomegranates, oranges and even figs. Summertime just isn't complete without a fresh peach to eat as you're walking around the backyard.


When we moved into our house we live in now, we were lucky to have a peach and persimmon tree already in the backyard. They were large and established. In fact, we moved in July and the peach tree was kind of like a welcome home present. The first week we moved in, the peach tree was already gifting us with fresh fruit. Some may have been a little overwhelmed with a whole peach tree but I was rejoicing.


Within the next few years we added some dwarf trees to our collection too; lemon, nectarine, plum, pear, mandarin and lime are now part of our family too. Whether you too have a backyard fruit tree, …

We're number one!

We're number one, we're number one!!


Every year towards the end of summer, the county Agriculture Commissioner offices release the crop reports for the previous year. The crop report is a compiling of the acreage, yield and gross values for the crops grown within the county. In California, the central valley eagerly awaits these numbers. But why? One reason, to see who is number one.


You have to understand something in California. We grow food to feed the world. The food we grow here, is not only consumed in our backyards and in our state, but the food we grow is shipped across the country and world. Our crop reports show us who grows the most. And because, we grow food for the state, nation and world we want to know who in California is the number one. In the Central Valley we are the heavy producers. Between Kern, Fresno and Tulare County the crop value is over $19 billion!


So when the 2016 Kern County Crop Report came out, everyone wanted to know, who would be number one. Kern County's crop value alone is nearly $7.2 billion. Now that's an impressive number. And between the three counties, Kern was the only county to see an increase from the year before.


Now what do these numbers mean? Well let me tell you, this doesn't mean the farmers in the county took home this much money. This is gross value of agriculture production. This doesn't include the cost of farming; water, labor, equipment, fuel, regulations, fees, fertilizers, etc. There is a lot that goes into making food, and none of that is covered here. We must remember that in California our water, if you have any, is very expensive. We have the highest minimum wage in the country and we are heavily regulated in doing business in this state. All these factors, make it very hard to farm in California, yet we do it. Don't ask me how, that is a whole other topic.


Needless to say though, I am proud to live and farm in a county that has the abilities, besides all its obstacles, to produce so much food. One in five jobs is directly or indirectly linked to agriculture production. I think people lose touch with this number. From the grocery store clerk, the truck driver, the produce broker, the field worker and the farmer there are so many hands that go into getting your food on your table.


So just how does Kern County and the rest of the central valley rank up?




Kern — $7.19 Billion
Tulare — $6.37 Billion
Fresno — $6.18 Billion


For the first time, Kern County is the number one agriculture producing county in the state and nation. We grow 40% of the states pistachios and 20% of the country's almonds. We grow more grapes or almonds than other counties total agriculture production.


I am proud to live and farm in Kern County. For the past several years, we suffered from a detrimental drought that cost us water, land, labor, farms and so much more. To have overcome such a lose and to come out on top shows that we are a strong county. Farmers and ranchers are tough. We know how to make more with less. We have had to grow more with less resources and we have done it well. So well, we are now number one.


Until Next Time,
Almond Girl Jenny

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Almond by-products

When people think of almond uses they tend to just think of using the almond meat. Almonds have multiple by-products actually. When almonds are processed at the huller the almond meat is separated from the hull and shell. The hulls, shells and hash are also sold and used.

Almond hulls are the green out most layer of the almond while on the tree. The hull is what splits and starts the countdown to harvest. Once the almond has dried in the field, the hull also dries and begins to separate from the almond. At the huller, they remove the hulls and stock pile them until sold. Almond hulls are sold for animal feed, most commonly dairy feed. The hulls actually add nutrition to the animals diet and aid in healthy milk production. Growing up on my family's farm, we used the hulls to feed our breeding sheep. It was cheaper than grain, helped to add nutrition to the animal diet and while filled them up faster.

Almond shells are the hard layer between the hull and the almond meat. …

Modern Agriculture

What is Modern Agriculture?
Modern agriculture could be a scientist in a lab creating the newest impossible non-meat hamburger. Modern agriculture could mean the development of GMO seeds to decrease pesticide use. Modern agriculture could be turning on your irrigation system from an app on your computer. Modern agriculture could just mean the use of GPS in tractors, or maybe just the use of a tractor on a farm. Modern agriculture could mean something different to you depending on how you look at agriculture.






Modern agriculture is essentially developing practices that help farmers increase efficiency and reduce the amount of resources to meet the world's needs. But depending on your interpretation of the term you could already have created your opinion of modern agriculture. 2% of the population is involved in agriculture but 100% of the population has opinions.
That's the situation we face today, consumers tend to develop their own opinions of modern agriculture without unders…

Bloom and freezing temperatures

It's the most beautiful time of year to be an almond farmer. The buds are blooming and flowers are open everywhere. But as Mother Nature presents herself, no beauty comes without a challenge.



The first full week of February came and it brought with it almond blossoms. Bees were brought in about a week before that. We want the bees to arrive before bloom starts so they can get acclimated with their surroundings. This way when the buds finally open and flowers pop out, the bees know exactly where to go and what to do.

When the bees arrived it was sunny with high 60 degree weather. It was perfect conditions for them to get to work, but the flowers weren't quite ready to pop yet.


Now as full bloom approaches, we have returned to cold weather where the bees don't want to work much during the days. Bees prefer warmer temperatures, so when it's too cold they stay in the hives most of the time. We have had multiple nights of mid to high 20s. Freezing temperatures at night will…