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Showing posts from March, 2014

hello 2020

hello 2020 and goodbye 2019. I am so ready for a new year and a new decade. As I was reminiscing on the last decade and especially the last few years, I couldn't help but feel overwhelmed with a sense of loss and grief. The last three years we have had to say goodbye to loved one that we weren't expecting to say goodbye to. Of course, there were highs mixed in with those lows. This year, Tim and I will celebrate TEN years of marriage, we welcomed two kids over the last five years, we are finally getting settled in to our homestead in the country and professionally are accomplishing some pretty cool things.

I looked back on my Instagram top nine and was happy to see so many great memories. I love seeing so many happy moments to reflect on. I had the amazing opportunity to see and listen to President Trump as he spoke at the American Farm Bureau Annual Meeting (1). I also had the opportunity to sit down an discuss agriculture solutions with our Governor Newsom (3). This Christma…

Spring and new life on the farm

Spring is here and the best sign of spring is new birth whether its baby chicks, bunny rabbits, blooming trees and in our case young almond trees. Over a month ago we had a big rain and wind storm that blew over 200 almond trees on our farm. So this spring, we replanted these trees. Every spring we go through all our fields and replant any openings where we lost trees throughout the winter and the previous growing season. If the orchard is over 20 years old we don't replant the openings because it takes 3-4 years for an almond tree to produce nuts and replanting does not make economic sense. An orchards life is generally 25-28 years before we remove it. So we have to think if we will get a good production out of the tree to replant or not. Most of our orchards are less than 20 years old, so we replanted all the openings except for one older orchard.


When we replant, we plant the tree into the prevailing wind and with a bamboo stake for support. This will ensure the tre…

Celebrate National Ag Week!

This week, March 23rd- 29th, is National Agriculture week. This week we celebrate the farmers and ranchers who work everyday to provide us with food and clothing we need every day. They work day in and day out caring for the crops and animals we eat three times a day. Have you stopped to thank a farmer today? Why does society set aside just one week to those who work so hard to ensure we have food on our tables? Next time you see a farmer, stop them and say thank you. It doesn't matter if it's National Agriculture Day or just an ordinary Wednesday, farmers like to hear from the ones enjoying their labor. Sometimes we get so caught up in our daily lives that we forget where the most common of things comes from or to just stop and take value in the resources we are given.

I ran across the below picture on social media this week and thought it says it perfectly. Farming may not be the most glorious or beautiful jobs out there, but they are the ones we utilize the most. The farmer…

Planting an almond orchard

So weprepped the field,installed the irrigation system, now we are ready to plant our next almond orchard! Before the trees come we have to make berms or mounds for the trees to be planted on. Berms help to divert rain water and irrigation water away from the tree trunk to prevent root and trunk diseases. To make the berms a surveyor comes into the field and measures the row spacing with laser surveying equipment. He marks the center of the berm with a white bag for the tractor operator to know where to put the berms. 



We make our tree rows 24 feet apart so the trees have plenty of room to grow. The tractor goes through the orchard and makes the berms for the trees to be planted on top of. Once the berms are formed then we go through the orchard and lay the drip hose on the mounds for irrigation.  When the drip hose is connected to the irrigation system, then it's time to bring in the trees!


The surveyor comes back and measures the tree location for planting and marks th…

Installing a drip irrigation system

The orchard we took out in out with old, has now gone through the reestablishing phase. The old orchard was on a flood irrigation system, which was very popular when the orchard was planted in the early 80s. Now we have come further with technology to know that drip irrigation is the best irrigation system for our soil type and water conditions.

Building a drip irrigation system takes multiple steps and is a several week process. First we ripped the soil, then we leveled the field to get ready for the new system. We worked with an irrigation company that engineered and designed design the new system. We hired a surveyor to lay out where everything was going to be placed, prior to starting construction of the new irrigation system. Knowing where everything is going to be installed before you get the to the field helps speed up the installation and avoid confusion.


So the ground is level and you have your plan, next the pipe arrives in huge semi truck loads. We take the pip…

Not only an employee, a member of the family

Growing up as a farmers daughter I drove around a lot with my father; checking on the trees, checking on the employees or just walking the orchards and learning from my Dad. I especially enjoyed checking the employees around lunch time, in which they would be cooking up some tacos, with homemade tortillas and salsa. At a young age I nicknamed one gentlemen, Taco Jesse, because he would always save a taco for me when he would see me coming. These lunch time visits were just the beginning of our family relationships with our employees. Every party or family wedding they would always be there to celebrate with us. Our employees had become part of our family as I grew up. From sun up to sun down, they spent more time with my family then their own sometimes. They weren't just working on my family farm for a pay check, our family farm was their livelihood too. If our farm was successful, they would be successful.

This last weekend I got to think about growing up on the farm and my relat…

There she blows...

Well, the Central Valley finally received some rain last weekend! While some parts of Northern California had a few inches, and neighborhoods in Los Angeles were being evacuated for fear of mud slides, the Kern County communities received anywhere between .35-.85 inches. It seems crazy, in our town some roads were flooded and lots of orchards lost hundreds of trees, and we didn't even get an inch of rain. What was most important was snow in the mountains and rain near the dams, which we received lots of. We are very thankful for what we received! But just because we received some rain we aren't free and clear, we are still in a drought. It could rain every day for the next month and we will still be in a drought.

The California Precipitation Stations measured Bakersfield to have received 1.55 inches of rain this season. Whereas in a normal year we should have received 4.57 inches thus far. The Central Valley is having 1-2 day periods of rainstorms and heavy wind follo…